Blizzard Schedule @ 2008 GDC San Francisco

Written by Medievaldragon on . Posted in Uncategorized

Blizzard Entertainment Job Recruiters will be talking face-to-face with aspirant fans and taking resumes at the 2008 Game Developers Conference (GDC) today throughout February 18-22 at the Career Pavilion Booth 714 on Moscone Center, San Francisco. ( resumes@blizzard.com )

Rob Pardo and other Developers will be keynote speakers at the event. Below is the excerpt of their program schedule:

Future of MMOs

Speaker: Rob Pardo (VP, Game Design, Blizzard Entertainment)

Date/Time: Thursday (February 21, 2008)  12:00pm — 1:00pm
Location (room): Room 135, North Hall
Track: Game Design
Secondary Track: Vision
Experience Level: All

Session Description
As the popularity of the MMO genre continues to soar, veteran gamers and potential initiates alike are looking beyond WoW for a new experience that breaks through the boundaries of traditional online gaming. Several experienced MMO developers will discuss their respective visions for the future, offering insights on game design, community involvement, and the challenges facing developers of MOGs in the next several years. The majority of this panel session is reserved for the combination of audience questions and for the panelists to discuss how they see the future unfolding; specifically where is this medium going and how is it going to get there.

Idea Takeaway
Some of the most experienced MMO developers will share their vision of the future landscape of the online game space.

Intended Audience
Anyone interested in massively multiplayer gaming, regardless of the client platforms used (PC, console, handheld or mobile).

Rules of Engagement: Blizzard’s Approach to Multiplayer Game Design

Speaker: Rob Pardo (VP, Game Design, Blizzard Entertainment)

Date/Time: Wednesday (February 20, 2008)  12:00pm — 1:00pm
Location (room): Room 135, North Hall
Track: Game Design
Experience Level: All

Session Description
While epic multiplayer gameplay has long been a defining characteristic of Blizzard Entertainment games, the company’s approach to achieving that result has evolved greatly over time. With each new project, Blizzard developers have applied lessons learned from the company’s previous games to continually update how they design and implement competitive and cooperative play features. In this presentation, Rob Pardo will discuss the goals the company strives for and the pitfalls it tries to avoid when developing the multiplayer elements of its games.

Audio for MMO’s

Speaker: Russell Brower (Director of Audio and Video, Blizzard Entertainment)

Date/Time: Thursday (February 21, 2008)  4:00pm — 5:00pm
Location (room): Room 2022, West Hall
Track: Audio
Experience Level: All

Session Description
What makes the development of audio for massively multiplayer online games different from any other type of game development? What unique opportunities do audio developers have when working on an MMO? What creative and technical challenges are faced by audio staff, contractors and management in creating audio for persistent worlds? Come and get these questions answered and more from the audio directors behind WORLD OF WARCRAFT, and LORD OF THE RINGS ONLINE.

From Mundane to Epic: The Making of the STARCRAFT II Cinematic Teaser

Speaker: Nick Carpenter (Cinematics Creative Director, Blizzard)

Date/Time: Thursday (February 21, 2008)  12:00pm — 1:00pm
Location (room): Room 2018, West Hall
Track: Visual Arts
Experience Level: All

Session Description
The STARCRAFT II Teaser represented a new chapter for Blizzard cinematics. The ability to use intricate models, create fine detail in animation, and implement very intentional complex lighting was just the start to ushering in this incredible game. This process was made possible by implementing many changes into our pipeline and creating characters and sets that visually supported the environment and story of STARCRAFT II. Four minutes in length and a total of 35 shots, the teaser was able to show off the abilities of our new renderer and display many of the artists’ talents. The models contained some of the largest poly counts we have developed thus far. Breaking the character and set into renderable pieces during the process of compositing and rendering for this level of precision was a big challenge, but in return the models showcased their tremendous detail. Camera angles and complex animation allowed us to focus on areas of machinery and armor that normally are not exposed, giving further insight into the level of complexity we were capable of achieving. Elaborate lighting and FX also allowed the marine and cell room to come alive. The teaser represents only the beginning of what this game is going to offer.

(202) Physics for Game Programmers

Speaker: Erin Catto (Physics Programmer, Blizzard Entertainment)

Date/Time: Tuesday (February 19, 2008)  10:00am — 6:00pm
Location (room): Room 2018, West Hall
Track: Programming
Experience Level: Intermediate

Session Description
As the visual quality of games has improved, more attention has been given to other aspects of a game to increase the feeling of reality during gameplay and distinguish it from its competitors. One of the most rapidly growing fields is physical simulation, as shown by discussion boards, the latest games, and a recent burst of articles and papers. Creating such a simulation may appear to be a daunting task, but it is possible with the right background. Doing so can also add a great deal of realism to animation systems and interactions between avatars and the world. This tutorial will provide a toolbox of techniques for programmers interested in creating physics engines, with references and links for those looking for more information. The focus of the course is to study various pieces of the simulation pipeline and show how problems along the way can be solved and optimized using standard 3D mathematical concepts and engineering know-how. Topics include rigid body dynamics, constraint systems and solvers, numerical robustness, relativistic frames, collision detection, and dynamic destruction. Sample code libraries and examples are provided.

Idea Takeaway
After taking this tutorial, the attendee should have an understanding of most of the core issues in simulation, so that they can take them into account when building their own simple physics and collision engines and incorporating them into their games.

Intended Audience
This tutorial is intended for those interested in physical simulation, whether they be building, using or simply understanding physics engines. A basic knowledge of Newtonian physics, calculus and vector algebra will be expected.

Be Sociable, Share!